Sunday, March 19, 2017

Traditional granaries for storage of rice - West Bengal

When you travel in rural Bengal, you will come across traditional rice granaries. After the harvest, rice is stored in these structures.

The granaries are of different sizes, but typically they stand between 10-20 feet tall from base to roof. They are built on raised platforms; a sensible way to protect them from flooding during the rain.

There are multiple rice crops during the year. It is the local practice to plant different varieties of rice. So a prosperous household with large holdings may have multiple granaries, or may store only 1 crop in the granary and the others in jute or synthetic gunny bags. I photographed these granaries in a Santhal village. These are typically small holdings, with not much surplus available for sale in the markets. The granaries are in the inner-courtyards, where the cooking is also done. You can see in the photo below, the grinding stone and the big wok.

These granaries are made with paddy straw, which is the by-product of the rice growing process. Once the rice is harvested and threshed, there is plenty of paddy available. Paddy straw is twisted into rope, and then used to build the walls of the granary. Rope making is traditionally the job of women, although these days there are machines to make these ropes.

Here is a closer look at the rope weave:

The inner walls of the structure are treated with clay and cowdung; this keeps away insects. The structure is then lined inside with more paddy.

The thatched roof is also made of paddy straw, which is available in plenty after the harvest. Many layers are used, in order to prevent rainwater from entering the structure. Those who can afford it also buy plastic tarpaulins as cover. The family invests money every couple of years in repairing, plastering and maintaining the granary.

After the harvest, the rice is sun-dried for preservation; and then it is put into the granary. Usually neem leaves are mixed along with the rice, to keep insects away. This photo below shows the open area used by one family for sun-drying their crop. Their paddy has also been neatly stacked away, for feeding cattle.
Sun-drying is a very important part of the preservation and storage process
These traditional methods of storage have stood the test of time and continue to be used even in modern era. We have much to gain from understanding and appreciating these sustainable methods of harvest storage. Of course, in spite of the precautions taken, the rice is under threat from infestation as well as rodents. Farmers monitor the stored grains; they remove insects and destroy infested grain from time to time. 

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Travels in rural Bengal - visiting a large household

I posted a photo previously; of a woman in a white saree milking cows. She was wearing the "inchi paar", the plain saree with a small one inch border in blue or green or brown. That type of saree is meant for widows. It never has red in the border. Red in Bengal is the colour of auspiciousness.

Contrast that with this other family I visited. They are landed gentry with several bighas of land.

The lady in white and red is the female head of this household and her husband is next to her. She is a tiny Jaya Bhaduri to her husband's tall Amitabh figure. The house where she is standing is an old one.

Her "laal paar" (saree with red border) is brand new and it is crackling stiff like tissue. The red of the saree along with her shakha pola (red and white bangles), and the sindoor on her forehead, announce her marital status as a shoubhagyaboti. Her husband is alive and kicking, she is blessed.

She has 10 sons! Her prestige is therefore doubly high. In one of the many inner courtyards of her house I met with two of her bahus. They were wearing the printed cotton that seems to be a big favourite in the villages. Batik is locally done in this district and is also very popular.

With me is Dr. Sarah Lamb an anthropologist who is studying aging in different communities in Bengal. Sarah lived for 2 years in a small Bengali village called Mangaldihi; she speaks fluent Bengali. We came on a nostalgia visit to meet an elderly aunt, whom Sarah had met a couple of decades ago.

The elderly aunt was relaxing in the sun when we saw her. She is more than 90 years old. You can see her in white blouse and petticoat with her back to the camera.

She was widowed at the age of 31 and had no children. She came back to her maternal home when she became old because she felt her in-laws house was not the place where she could get care. The tall gentleman in the dhoti is her brother.

She inherited land from her husband and in exchange for looking after her, she has willed the land to her brother. Within 5 minutes of meeting, she explained this to Sarah and me. She wanted us to know that she was not freeloading on her maternal home. A girl never belongs in her mother's house, you see...

I learnt a lot about rural society and structures for the survival of the elderly through this visit. She has come to her maternal home because this is where she still has more comfort. She wants to die here. Although she said clearly to us that she will hit a century before she dies!

Monday, February 27, 2017

Couple milking cows, Birbhum, West Bengal

I have been travelling in rural Bengal, and have visited many villages. I saw and learnt many things, and I hope I can find the time to post at least some of the pics. Here is the first one. In a little village in Birbhum district, about 4hrs from Kolkata, I came across this couple and their cows. 

As soon as you drive away from Kolkata, you start to see women wearing cotton instead of the hideous synthetics that dominate city markets. I loved the contrast of her pure white taant shadee, against the skin and the brown hay...isn't it lovely? And here still, the British imposed modesty of the blouse has not made its way to the older generation. I wish we could all be like this, but now that Victorian prudery is well established, there is not much hope. Strangely, the modern Indian woman seems to be going back to the choli-less state! With halter necks, thin straps etc! But we are yet to see in the city memsahib, the casual nonchalant grace of this woman.

I always thought cows were milked at dawn, but I came across this couple a little after noon (as you can see from the shadows). I realised that the milk is probably being used for their own consumption, and they are not taking it to market. That's why they have the flexibility to milk at any time.The cows here don't have the oversized udders which you see in commercially reared cattle. A more natural state, perhaps.

From what I can tell, these are the indigenous Gir breed of cattle. There is some misguided effort by the government to cross-breed these with foreign breeds for higher milk yields, but it's a myopic policy. By improving feed and care, the same Indian breeds can produce much more milk, and they are in fact, doing so very successfully in Brazil.

Cows and bullocks are valuable and are usually housed in little sheds. On this shed, we saw the harvest of masur dal (red Bengal lentil). Bengali Comfort food = rice and pyaj diye moshur dal :)

Some people earn their livelihood by taking animals to graze. The man in this photo doesn't look like he is the owner of these calves; he is probably on some kind of wage.

Every village you visit has walls decorated with cow-pats. Cows provide much of the fuel used for cooking.
And of course, no meal is complete without some milk sweets! On the menu: a sort of bread pakoda, bread dipped in an egg wash (duck's eggs, because the Brahmins here don't eat chicken), two types of milk sweets (sandesh), a ghugni with motor (peas), and a delicious salad of cucumber tomatoes and onion.
Dr. Sarah Lamb is an anthropologist, who spent 2 years living in a village in West Bengal. We were on a nostalgic visit to meet one of the families. What a lovely day.

Thursday, December 29, 2016

Adyar Food Walk - Filter Coffee

In large parts of south India, the best part of the day is the early morning cup of filter coffee :) 

It is drunk in a 'tumbler and davarah'. The tumbler is the glass, and the davarah the bottom container. An important part of the process is pouring the coffee back and forth, between the tumbler and davarah. This helps to mix the sugar, milk and coffee decoction; while also cooling it to the right temperature. More importantly, it aerates the coffee to produce froth, without introducing any additional water into it (Western-style espresso machines use a steam wand to produce froth). 

Coffee is not native to India. It came from Yemen, smuggled into south India by a Sufi mystic named Baba Budan. He planted them in the Chandragiri hills of Karnataka (in the Chikmaglur district). The hills have since then been renamed in his honour.

The southern Indian states of Karnataka, Kerala, and Tamilnadu account for most of the coffee grown. Coffee is usually inter-cropped with pepper, cardamom, banana, arecanut, orange and vanilla. 

Saturday, November 26, 2016

Koorkai: the Winter Soul Food of Kerala

- By Shobna Iyer

Full name, koorka kazhungu, quite a mouthful, yes? Nickname, koorkai.

The koorkai is a tuber that begins life like others of its ilk, underground. Once dug up, it is quite common to find them appearing as near-perfect rounds which would explain its latin name P. Rotundifolius.

The 'P' may as well stay silent since its presence does little to highlight the shape. It's also called the Chinese Potato though its origin was in West Africa, now figure that cross-many-borders puzzle.
The time consuming part about making koorka is the peeling, a legal shortcut involves putting the uncooked tubers into a jute bag and jostling it until the peels oblige and you know, slip off. If you cook the koorka, this method is illegal. That is simply because the peel comes off easily once pressure cooked. Why would anyone choose the former method? Well, it tastes way better. Deep fried, like chips.

The common koorkai is best in fried form, you know, first fry up the mustard seeds, a dash of white lentil, a few red chillies and turmeric powder to a respectable quantity of oil. It's winter food, fried is good winter food. To this, add the pre-boiled, peeled and cubed tuber to this. Some may cut it long, some add it whole (which involves selecting similarly sized roundelles just to add to the time consumed), to each their own.

As with all highly recommended fried tubers, this is best had hot with rice and spicy rasam. Or plain.


Near perfect rounds, called spheres in polite circles
We'll call the hairs tangents
Geometry session can be had
As you eat, there shouldn't be hairy tangents though
They draw away from the food at hand (pun, anyone?)


The worthwhile outcome
What I like is the greasy no-holds-barred name, mezhuku (oil) varati (tossed till it shrivels to a fraction) 

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

New Market Walk: Food and Shopping in Hogg Saheb's Bazaar

Here's the latest addition to our bouquet; a new tour in Calcutta designed exclusively for eating and shopping!

The tour takes you through the lanes of New Market, one of the most popular bazaars in Calcutta. 



 Built in 1874 as a posh “Whites Only" shopping complex, New Market today spills chaotically over to the adjoining streets, selling everything under the sun.


You can sample delicacies from the most iconic bakeries in the city (among other things).


And shop to your heart's content. 


Find out more about the tour on our website
See more photos of the tour on our Facebook page.

Parama Padam: The 'Snakes and Ladders' of India

Snakes and Ladders originated in India as part of a family of dice board games. It was called Mokshapat or Moksha Patamu. Like many other things in India, this one also has religious background, and represents the ascent to Vaikunta or Paramapadam, the Supreme Abode of Lord Vishnu. It is most popularly played by people trying to stay awake on the holy night of Vaikunta Ekadasi. You can buy it in shops near Vishnu temples.

This one is from Giri Stores in Mylapore.



The game made its way to England and was sold as "Snakes and Ladders", then the basic concept was introduced in the United States as "Chutes and Ladders".

Monday, October 3, 2016

Food Walk through Adyar

We're very excited to announce our latest food tour in Chennai - Food Walk through Adyar :)

Walk with us through the quiet (and sometimes not so quiet!) bylanes of this neighbourhood.


Sample some traditional South Indian delicacies at iconic, local establishments.


Check our facebook album for more!


Saturday, September 17, 2016

The Story behind Bada Imambara - Lucknow's Architectural Marvel

- By Aishwarya Javalgekar

The Bada Imambara is the most popular monument in Lucknow. It is also called Asifi Imambara  after Asaf-ud Daula, the Nawab of Awadh who is entombed in the Imambara's central hall.
The grand Bada Imambara facade (Photo credits: Wikipedia)
Not only is this Imambara marvelous to look at, it has a back-story, that adds more romance to this beautiful monument. 

In 1785, Awadh was hit by a devastating famine, leaving thousands of people jobless and starving. Nawab Asaf-ud Daula took up the grand project of building this Imambara to provide employment to these people. People were given food in return for work. Thus the Nawab made sure that his subjects did not starve during the famine.
Zoffany's painting: 'Asaf ud-Daula, Nawab Wazir of Oudh', 1784. (Photo credits: The New York Times)
The common people used to work during the day to build the structure, while noblemen and the other elite worked at night and demolished parts of the structure for payment. This brilliant scheme kept the construction in progress for almost a decade! 

It is inspiring to see how a simple project helped thousands of people, saving an entire kingdom from devastation and poverty. And the Bada Imambara remains a living reminder of the Nawab's brilliance and generosity. 

Even today, there is a well-known saying in Lucknow - 
Jisko na de Maula, usko de Asaf-ud Daula
(He who does not receive (livelihood) from God, will receive it from Asaf-ud Daula)

Saturday, September 10, 2016

Scaffolding at the Taj Mahal: Update on Sep 10, 2016

August 10, 2016
In August we had posted about the scaffolding put up on the Taj Mahal due to ongoing restoration work by the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI). Here's a small picture of how the Taj Mahal looked in August.

The scaffolding will remain for the rest of the year as work progresses throughout the monument. It is mid-September now, and ASI has speeded up the work. The scaffolding is coming off quickly now.
Taj Mahal - Sep 10, 2016
This recent picture shows that from the platform, scaffolding is only visible on the front ride side. The scaffolding on the front left minaret has been taken off now.

Keep an eye on the blog for further updates.

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

The Shankha-kshetra of Puri

- By Aishwarya Javalgekar

The famous Puri Rath Yatra (Chariot Festival) was held this July in Orissa. As I was reading up on the festival, I came across a very interesting image.
A conch shaped map of Puri's places of worship
But first let me give you a short introduction. Jagannath is an important deity of Orissa. The Jagannath temple in Puri is also the abode of his siblings, Baladeva and Subhadra. These three deities are carried in three enourmous chariots during the Rath Yatra.

According to the article I read, the region of Puri is shaped like a conch, and is called Shankha-kshetra. Similarly Bhubaneshwar is called Chakra-kshetra and Konark is named Padma-kshetra, all representing attributes of the Hindu god Vishnu.

As you can see in the picture, the temple of Jagannath stands at the heart of the conch, which acts like a map of Puri itself. Around the temple are numerous temples, shrines, trees and other religious sites.  There are approximately 115 such sacred spots scattered around the Jagannath temple, connected to the temple through a network of roads like a spiderweb.

I am not sure if the places drawn on the image are to scale. It is nevertheless a beautiful
visual of the Shankha-kshetra.

If you want to know more about the Rath Yatra, you can read our article here.

Sunday, August 14, 2016

The Lucknow School of Miniature Painting

This beautiful piece called 'Ascetics resting in a camp beside a Shrine' is a Mughal miniature painting from the Lucknow School. Created in the 1820s, it currently resides in the Mittal Museum of Hyderabad alongwith minature paintings from different schools across the country.

The Mughal style of miniature painting emerged in India during the 16th century. A blend of Persian, Hindu, Jain and Buddhist influences, the style developed in Mughal courts. It later spread to all courts, leading to the formation of different schools of Indian miniature painting.

The Lucknow School painted in the Mughal tradition, with some Rajput influences. This style of painting was popular till the 1800s, but declined slowly after the demise of the Awadhi Nawab Asaf-ud Daula. Later the school developed with European influences during the reign of Nawab Shuja-ud-Daula. By the end of the 18th century, the Lucknow school had become a Indo-European style of miniature painting.

'Ascetics resting in a camp beside a Shrine' c. 1825-30
Even today in many parts of the country, you can see groups of bairagis (ascetics) gathered together. Look at all the skin colours and the costumes that the artist has represented in this painting; showcasing the diversity of the bairagis. 

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Update - Scaffolding at the Taj Mahal

A few weeks back we had put up a post about the restoration work going on at the Taj Mahal, with a picture of the scaffolding on it pillars. Here's the picture:



We now have been told that this scaffolding would most probably remain for the rest of the year. They are also putting up new scaffolding on the central body of the structure.

Here's a picture of the scaffolding as of 9th August, 2016.


We'll keep posting new updates here. 

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Veeragallu - The Hero Stones of Karnataka

by Karishma Shah

Hero worship is a popular theme across mainstream Indian cinema. Films typically portray heroes as a saviour of the masses, someone who is willing to sacrifice himself for the greater good.

Such morals and sentiments may seem misplaced in the modern world, but between the 5th and 13th centuries AD, these sacrificial qualities were worthy of commemoration. Memorial stones were erected to immortalise those who selflessly pledged their life for the protection of women, village men and property.

Hero stones (called veeragallu in Kannada) are found all over India. These ornate stones are spread all over Karnataka; many are also found in the neighbouring states of Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh. 
A three panel hero stone at the Kedareshvara temple, Shimoga dist. Karnataka.
Image courtesy: Wikimedia commons
A Hero stone is divided into three sections: the lower portion gives details of the hero and his act of sacrifice (fighting the enemy with a sword or a bow, the army, cattle, or a damsel in distress). The middle panel shows the hero being carried to heaven by angel, and the highest panel depicts him sitting in front of a God, generally represented by the Shiva Linga.

Some have 5 or 7 panels too:

5 panel hero stone with old Kannada inscription
Image courtesy: Wikimedia commons
They often carry inscriptions displaying a variety of adornments, including bas relief panels, frieze, and figures on carved stone. Usually they are in the form of a stone monument and may have an inscription at the bottom with a narrative of the battle.

The classification of hero stones is based on the event for which the sacrifice was made. The Karnataka Itihasa Academy has a wonderful section with photos of hero stones. Dr. Devarakonda Reddy, historian and cultural expert, has published a classification of hero stones:

1. Attack on Forts
These depict war scenes with soldiers riding on elephants and horses. Some have a fort wall etched in them. The Begur veergallu (pictured below) is the most notable and can be found at the Bangalore museum.
Begur veeragallu, Bangalore Museum. Photo credit: Karnataka Itihasa Academy

2. Ooralivu (Defending the village)
A hero must be ready to defend the village from enemy attacks at any given time.

3. Gadi Kalaga (Defending borders)
Border disputes among neighbouring villages were common. Defending their territory from encroachment was an honourable way to go.
Photo credit: Dr Devarakonda Reddy
4. Go Grahana (Defending cattle)
Cattle was an indicator of wealth, and cattle lifting was a common practice with the kings of ancient India, as with the chiefs of ancient Greece. In the Mahabharata, the theft of cattle by Duryodhana was regarded as an insult, leading to the Battle of Viratnagar. The hero stones commemorate the men who defended such capture or theft of cattle.
Go Grahana, Hassan Museum
Photo Credit: Dr Devarakonda Reddy
4. Pendirudeyurchu, Penbuyyall (Savior of Women)
These commemorate heroes who sacrificed themselves to protect the dignity of women being assaulted by the enemies.
Protecting women's modesty
Photo Credit: Dr Devarakonda Reddy
5. Bete (Hunting)
Hunting was a very popular recreational game in Karnataka for royalty; and killing a wild beast such as a tiger or wild boar was no mean feat. Dogs were trained to corner the boars, and accompanied the men on these hunts. They hunted deer, crocodiles and defended themselves from a bear attack.

The Atakur inscription (939 AD) is unique, commemorating the death of the favorite hound of a grief stricken king (the hound died fighting a wild boar). Melagani located in Mulbagal taluk, Kolar,  has two memorial stones of 10th century erected for heroic endeavor of two hounds namely Loga and Dhalaga. Loga killed 70 boars and Dhalaga 50 boars.
Handi Bete (Wild Boar)
Photo Credit: Dr Devarakonda Reddy
Huli Bete (Tiger)
Photo Credit: Dr Devarakonda Reddy
If you are visiting Karnataka, a great place to see these stones is Agrahara Bachhali, where they are housed in a temple-like enclosure. Make a day trip from Mysore, which is very close.

Monday, August 8, 2016

Ceramic jars at the Goa Chitra Museum, Benaulim

- by Aishwarya Javalgekar

Ceramic Jars at Goa Chitra Museum
If you go to the Goa Chitra Museum in Benaulim, Goa, you'll see these beautiful ceramic jars, in a uniform white and brown design. These elegant jars were traditionally used in Goan households to store cooking oil.

Goan cuisine is a blend of different culinary traditions; Hindu, Mughal and Portuguese. These diverse traditions are brought together by local ingredients such as vegetables, oils and spices, that given the cuisine its sumptious flavour.

The most important oil used in this cuisine is coconut oil.

Coconut oil is extracted from copra, dried pieces of coconut. The oil, which is usually a clear liquid, turns into a creamy white solid in cold weather. Most of the dishes in Goan and South Indian cuisine rely on coconut oil for their authentic flavour.

Apart from coconut oil, sesame, gingelli, groundnut and sunflower oils are also frequently used in Goan food. Other oils used are castor oil, cashew oil, cotton seed oil, neem oil, clove oil and eucalyptus oil.

I can almost picturize the jars, slick with oil, kept in an old Goan kitchen. Can you?